Golf Swing Basics and Other Ways to Drop Your Score

Many golfers have a magic score that they're trying to break, and whether its 100, 90 or breaking par the feeling of tallying up the score at the end of the round and seeing a personal best is pretty amazing. The reality is that many players struggle for years trying to improve their golf swing and trying to beat their personal best. If you're like most golfers who shoot in the 90's and 100's the core focus of any practise is not usually golf swing basics and consists of hitting balls with reckless abandonment (who doesn't like gripping it and ripping it!). In this article we'll highlight golf tips that will help you improve your golf score.

High handicappers (18+) without the proper golf swing basics usually hit about 3 greens in regulation, meaning that there are 15 holes in which you are required to chip onto the green. Professional golfers get up and down from off the green about 85% of the time, whereas the high handicapper is closer to the 20% range. Now, we can't expect that you'll become the next Tiger or Phil, but if practise your chipping and can increase from 20% to 50% you'll share about 5 strokes off your golf score. How many times have you practised chipping, other than the 5 minutes prior to a round of golf?

The one club in your golf bag that you'll use more than any other is the putter; with a high handicapper taking roughly 36 putts in a round. Not only do you take so many shots with one club, but there is nothing more frustrating than finally having a great golf swing and hitting a green in regulation, with a 20 foot putt for birdie only to walk away with a bogey on the golf score card. Unlike the challenges of trying to practise your golf swing in the living room, you can easily practise the fundamentals of putting at home. Your floor is flat (or it should be) which allows you to practise the basic swing movements and fine tune your swing. However there is nothing like practising on a real green and its worth spending an extra time on the green.

Having a great golf swing on the tee sets the tone for the hole. Although the golf courses - https://golfplayguide.com/ ' most people play don't typically have US Open rough and generally have wide landing areas; hitting it down the middle is still important. Nothing feels better than ripping a drive down the fairway and picking up the tee before the ball lands. On the contrary if you're trying to keep the line of which tree your golf drive went into the woods you're not mentally preparing yourself for the next shot. Rather you're thinking about how to fix your drive (which you won't need for another 15 minutes), where the ball may be, will you need to take a stroke and the fact that it was a brand new Pro-V.

Beers per round varies greatly between the high handicapper and the pros. In all seriousness if you want to improve your score, keep the beers to a minimum.

Golf is a difficult and demanding sport that takes hours upon hours of practise to master and improve your golf swing basics. The reality is that most weekend golfers don't have the time to spend hours on the practise green and range, yet they still want to see improvement. The best advice is to understand which areas of your golf game you can improve the greatest with the lease amount of work. Like many things is life, use your time wisely and you too can achieve your golf goals.

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